NEW RESEARCH: AUSTRALIANS ENGAGE IN FOOD PORN FRENZY AT BREAKFAST

31 August 2016 – New research has revealed when it comes to breakfast we love to share, with half a million Australians posting photos of their bowls of breakfast cereal to social media every day.1

The Galaxy Research study1 of Australian breakfast habits reported two million Australians posted social shots of their breakfast cereal at least once a week – that’s almost 400 million breakfast bowl posts a year.

Of the snappers, it was Aussie men who shared the most cereal food porn on social media, being three times more likely to post a pic than women.1

Food blogger and stylist Jennifer Jenner said the opportunity to personalise brekkie cereal bowls is one of the main reasons for their popularity on social media.

“A simple, beautifully styled bowl of brekkie cereal can look gorgeous and taste great in itself, however with the opportunity for people to get adventurous with their flavour and styling combos, the brekkie bowl can be a real social media star,” said Ms Jenner, founder of blog 84thand3rd.com.

“We’re starting to see people get really creative using more savoury combinations such as cereal with vegetables or fresh herbs. This trend will continue to grow as it gives people the option of a quick and easy sweet or savoury brekkie cereal bowl.”

The Galaxy Research showed just over half a million (564,000) Australians already added vegetables to their brekkie cereal, almost a million (916,000) added herbs and spices, half a million (574,000) added spreads like peanut butter, but fruit (7.1 million) and nuts (3.8 million) were the most popular toppings (10 million).1

Advanced Accredited Practising Dietitian and Australian Breakfast Cereal Manufacturers Forum Director Ms Leigh Reeve said while choosing Insta-worthy cereal toppings was most important for nearly half a million (480,000) 1 Australians, the vast majority of people based their brekkie decisions on what was healthy.

“We know from the research that those who choose a brekkie cereal bowl are looking for something that’s healthy (58%) and fills them up (48%) with most people describing their brekkie bowl as a meal to give them energy and keep them going throughout the day (44%),” said Ms Reeve.

“Their choice is supported by the latest Australian Bureau of Statistics data that tells us people who ate breakfast cereal, over other breakfasts, had slimmer waists and were more likely to be a healthy weight, plus they had significantly greater nutrient intakes and were more likely to meet nutrient targets. 2

“My tip for a healthy brekkie bowl that will see you through the morning is to make sure you’re eating a substantial breakfast with enough fibre and protein; aiming for about 1/5 of your daily kilojoules in the morning,” said Ms Reeve.

“Opt for higher protein, whole grain or higher fibre brekkie cereals with milk or calcium-rich alternatives, and team with Greek yoghurt and fruit or nuts. This will boost both the fibre and protein content of the meal to help regulate your appetite and increase satiety. Cereal fibre is also crucial for long term wellbeing and healthy ageing – and it ticks the box for good gut health too.”

The Galaxy Research study also uncovered more eccentric breakfast habits, which included:

  • More than 300,000 Aussies ate cereal with a fork,
  • 1 million had a special spoon they always use for cereal,
  • 1 million Australians ate cereal straight from the box,
  • 3 million like to build brekkie bowls with layers or sections, and
  • Nearly half a million Australians used a mason jar for their bowl.1

Food sensory expert at The Australian Institute of Food Science and Technology (AIFST)

Dr Cathy Gair said our individual breakfast habits, even those that may appear a little odd, were often connected to satisfying our senses.

“Morning hunger can send our senses into overdrive, so when it comes to brekkie we are all driven to satisfy these. As well as building our bowl for great taste, we might also want to layer our foods so we can see the various colours, or mix it all together to enjoy the various textures and flavours as we eat. Most of us look for an audible ‘crunch’ from the cereal, with many adding various elements such as seeds or nuts for added texture,” said Dr Gair.

“Satisfying our senses naturally increases the variety of foods we eat and is an evolutionary trait that helps us meet all our nutritional needs by ensuring we get a range of vitamins and minerals from an array of different foods.”

When it comes to the variety that goes in the brekkie bowl, the country was divided – 59 per cent loved their cereal simple – just plain with milk – while 41 per cent of Australian cereal eaters pimped up their bowl with added extras. 1

The Galaxy research was commissioned by the Australian Breakfast Cereal Manufacturers Forum (ABCMF) and conducted among a representative sample of 1,382 Australians 18 years and older who ate breakfast cereal in the past month. The survey was conducted in July. A research backgrounder is available for more findings from the study.

 

References

  1. Responses from Galaxy Research conducted in July 2016 among a nationally representative sample of 1,382 respondents across Australia
  2. Nutrition Research Australia, Breakfast and Breakfast Cereal Consumption Among Australians – A secondary analysis of the 2011-12 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey, Sydney, February 2016
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