REFERENCES

KIDS & BREKKIE INFOGRAPHIC

    1. Galaxy Research, May 2015, survey of n=1000 Australian parents of primary school children aged 5-12 years.
    2. Williams PG. The Benefits of Breakfast Cereal Consumption: A Systematic Review of the Evidence Base. Advances in Nutrition 2014; 5: 636S-673S.
    3. Fayet F, Ridges L, Sritharan N, Petocz P. Breakfast cereal consumption is associated with higher micronutrient and milk intake among Australian Children. Australasian Medical Journal 2011; 4(12):775.
    4. Hoyland A, Dye L, Lawton CL. A systematic review of the effect of breakfast on the cognitive performance of children and adolescents. Nutrition Research Reviews 2009; 22: 220-243.

A HEALTHY HABIT and 5 MINUTES, BIG REWARDS

    1. Williams PG. The Benefits of Breakfast Cereal Consumption: A Systematic Review of the Evidence Base. Adv Nutr 2014;5:636S-673S. doi:10.3945/an.114.006247
    2. Cho S, et al. (2003) The Effect of Breakfast Type on Macronutrient Intakes and Body Mass Index (BMI) of Americans. J. Am. Coll. Nutr. 22: 296-302.
    3. Deshmukh-Taskar PR, et al. (2010). The relationship of breakfast skipping and type of breakfast consumption with nutrient intake and weight status in children and adolescents: The national health and nutrition examination survey 1999-2006. J Am Diet Assoc. 110: 869-878.
    4. Gibson SA, O´Sullivan KR. 1995. Breakfast cereal consumption patterns and nutrient intakes in British schoolchildren. Journal of Royal Society of Health. 115 (6): 366-370.
    5. Preziosi P, Galan P, Deheeger M, Yacoub N, Drewnowski A, Hereberg S. (1999) Breakfast type, daily nutrient intakes and vitamin and mineral status of French children, adolescents and adults. J. Am. Coll. Nutr. 18(2): 171-178.
    6. Croezen S, et al. (2009) Skipping breakfast, alcohol consumption and physical inactivity as risk factors for overweight and obesity in adolescents: results of the E-MOVO project. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. V63-I3: 405-12.
    7. De la Hunty A, Ashwell M. (2007) Are people who regularly eat breakfast cereals slimmer than those who don´t? A systematic review of the evidence. Nutrition Bulletin. V32-I2: 118-28.
    8. Kennedy E, Davies C. (1998) US Department of Agriculture School Breakfast Programme. Proceedings of the Napa Valley Symposium Cognition and School Learning 1995. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 67: 743S-5S.
    9. Kosti RI, et al. (2008) The association between consumption of breakfast cereals and BMI in school children aged 12-17 years: The VYRONAS study. Public Health Nutrition. V11-I10: 1015-21.
    10. Lightowler HJ, Henry CJK. (2009) An investigation of the effectiveness of ready-to-eat breakfast cereals in weight loss: comparison between single and mixed varieties. Nutrition Bulletin. V34: 48-53.
    11. Matthys C, et al. (2007) Breakfast habits affect overall nutrient profiles in adolescents. Public Health Nutrition. V10-I4: 413-21.
    12. Benton, D., Parker, P.Y. 1998. Breakfast, blood glucose, and cognition. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 67: 772S-8S.
    13. Mahoney CR, et al. (2005) Effect of breakfast composition on cognitive processes in elementary school children. Physiology & Behavior. V85: 635-645.
    14. Rampersaud GC, et al. (2005) Breakfast Habits, Nutritional Status, Body Weight, and Academic Performance in Children and Adolescents. Journal of American Dietetic Association. V105-I5: 743-760.
    15. Rampersaud GC. (2009). Benefits of breakfast for children and adolescents: update and recommendations for practitioners. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. V3-I2: 86-103.
    16. Sandercock GRH, Voss C, Dye L. (2010) Associations between habitual school-day breakfast consumption, body mass index, physical activity and cardio respiratory fitness in English schoolchildren. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1-7.
    17. Szajowska H, Ruszczynsk, M. (2010) Systematic Review demonstrating that breakfast consumption influences body weight outcomes in children and adolescents in Europe. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition. 50:113-119.
    18. Haines PS, Guilkey DK, Popkin B. (1996) Trends in breakfast consumption of US adults between 1965 and 1991. J. Am. Diet Assoc. 96(5): 464-470.
    19. Wolfe WS, Campbell CC, Frongillo EA, Haas JD, Melnik TA. (1994) Overweight schoolchildren in New York State: Prevalence and characteristics. Am. J. Pub. Health. 84(5): 807-813.
    20. Pollitt E, et al. (1981) Brief fasting, stress and cognition in children. Am. J. of Clin. Nutr. 34: 1526-1533.
    21. Pollitt E, Mathews R. (1998) Breakfast and cognition: an integrative summary. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. V67: 804S–13S.
    22. Kleinman RE, et al. (20020 Diet, breakfast, and academic performance in children. Ann Nutr Metab. 46 (suppl 1): 24-30.
    23. Wyon DP, Abrahamsson L, Jartelius M, Fletcher R. (1997) An experimental study of the effect of energy intake at breakfast on the test performance of 10-year old children in school. Int. J. Food Sc. Nutr. 48: 5-12.
    24. ABCMF Study, 2013, Galaxy Research. A representative sample of 1001 Australians aged 18-64 years. 
    25. Australian Breakfast Cereal Manufacturers Forum calculation based in part on data reported by Nielsen through its ScanTrack and Homescan service for the Cereals, Fresh Milk and UHT Milk categories, Cereal Partners Worldwide for the 52-week period ending December 31, 2016. (Copyright © 2016, Nielsen.)
    26. Australian Bureau of Statistics. Australian Health Survey: Nutrition First Results – Foods and Nutrients, 2011-12. Canberra: ABS; 2014.

KEY STATISTICS

    1. Kellogg Company 2011
    2. Aztec Temple Data June 2012
    3. Cereal Social Trends Report for ABCMF. McCrindle Research 2012.

FAQs

    1. Williams PG. The Benefits of Breakfast Cereal Consumption: A Systematic Review of the Evidence Base. Adv Nutr 2014;5:636S-673S. doi:10.3945/an.114.006247.
    2. Rampersaud GC, Periera, MA, Girard, BL, Adams, J. And Metzl, JD. (2005) Breakfast habits, nutritional status, body weight and academic performance in children and adolescents. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 105:743-760.
    3. Albertson AM, Thompson D, Franko DL, Kleinman RE, Barton, BA, & Crockett, SJ. (2008) Consumption of breakfast cereal is associated with positive health outcomes. Evidence from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood 433 Institute Growth and Health Study. Nutrition Research, 28, 744–752.
    4. Gibson SA, & Gunn P. (2011) What’s for breakfast? Nutritional implications of breakfast habits. Insights from the NDNS dietary records. Nutrition Bulletin, 36, 505 78–86.
    5. Williams P. (2007) Breakfast and the diets of Australian children and adolescents. An analysis of data from the 1995 National Nutrition Survey. International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, 58, 201–216.
    6. Williams PG. (2005) Breakfast and the diets of Australian adults. An analysis of data from the 1995 National Nutrition Survey. International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition 56 65-79.
    7. Rampersaud GC, Periera MA, Girard BL, Adams J And Metzl JD. (2005) Breakfast habits, nutritional status, body weight and academic performance in children and adolescents. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 105:743-760.
    8. Smith KJ, Gall SL, McNaughton SA, Blizzard L, Dwyer T, Venn AJ. (2010) Skipping breakfast: longitudinal associations with cardiometabolic risk factors in the Childhood Determinants of Adult Health Study. J Am Diet Assoc; doi: 10.3945/ajcn.2010.30101
    9. De la Hunty A, Ashwell M. (2007) Are people who regularly eat breakfast cereals slimmer than those who don´t? A systematic review of the evidence. Nutrition Bulletin. V32-I2: 118-28.
    10. Kleemola P. et. al. (1999) Eur J Clin Nutr 53(9):716-721.)
    11. Franko DL, Albertson AM, Thompson DR, Barton BA. (2011) Cereal consumption and indicators of cardiovascular risk in adolescent girls. Public Health Nutr. Apr;14(4):584-90. Epub 2010 Jul 19.
    12. Huang CJ, Hu HT, Fan YC, Liao YM, and Tsai, PS. (2010) Association of breakfast skipping with obesity and health-related quality-of-life: evidence from a national survey in Taiwan. Int J Obesity, 34;720-725.
    13. Chaplin K and Smith AP. (2011) Breakfast and Snacks: Associations with Cognitive Failures, Minor Injuries, Accidents and Stress, Nutrients 3;515- 528;doi:10.3390/nu3050515.
    14. Smith A. (2005) The concept of wellbeing: relevance to nutrition research. B J Nutr;93,Suppl1.,S1-5.
    15. Smith AP. (2002) Stress, Breakfast Cereal Consumption and Cortisol, Nutritional Neuroscience, 5(2),141-144.
    16. Smith AP. (2010) Breakfast cereal, fibre, digestive problems and wellbeing: current topics in Nutraceutical Research, 8,No 2/3;1-10.
    17. Nicklas T , Myers L, Reger C, Beech B, & Berenson GS. (1998). Impact of breakfast consumption on nutritional adequacy of the diets of young adults in 564 Bogalusa, Louisiana. Ethnic and gender contrasts. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 98, 1432–1438.
    18. Rampersaud GC, Periera MA, Girard BL, Adams J and Metzl JD. (2005) Breakfast habits, nutritional status, body weight and academic performance in children and adolescents. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 105:743-760.
    19. NUTTAB 2010. Commonwealth of Australia and Food Standards Australia New Zealand 2011.
    20. Barton BA, Eldridge AL, Thompson D, Affenito SG, Striegel-Moore RH, Franko DL, Albertson AM and Crockett SJ. (2005) The Relationship of Breakfast and cereal consumption to nutrient intake and Body Mass Index; The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 105: 1383-1389.
    21. Grieger JA, Chan L, Moss C, Miller M, Celander M, Cobiac L. Diet and physical activity differences in Australian adolescent male consumers and non consumers of ready-to-eat cereals. Nutrition Society of Australia. Perth, 2010.
    22. ABCMF calculation based in part on Neilsen Scan Data for the Cereal and Fresh Milk Categories for the 104-week period ending July 3, 2012, for the Australian Grocery Market. (Copyright © 2012, The Neilsen Company). 40g serve.
    23. Woolworths Online accessed 25 June 2012.
    24. Cereal Social Trends Report for ABCMF. McCrindle Research 2012.
    25. Fayet F, Ridges L, Sritharan N, Petocz P. (2011) Breakfast cereal consumption is associated with higher micronutrient and milk intake among Australian Children. Presented at Joint Australia and New Zealand Nutrition Society Conference in Queenstown, December 2011.
    26. Grimes CA, Campbell KJ, Riddell LJ, Nowson CA. (2011) Sources of sodium in Australian children’s diets and the effect of the implication of sodium targets to food products to reduce sodium intake British Journal of Nutrition 105:468-477.
    27. CSIRO. Cereal Foods and Legume Consumption by Australian Children: Secondary Analysis of the 2007 National Children’s Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey. 2009
    28. Williams PG, McMahon A, Boustead R. (2003) A case study of sodium reduction in breakfast cereals and the impact of the Pick the Tick food information program in Australia. Health Promotion International, 18 (1), 51-56.
    29. National Health and Nutrition Examinations Survey Data (2003-2006). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) Hyattville, MD. US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; data for boys and girls 6-17 years of age.
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