REFERENCES

ABOUNT ABCMF

  1. Aztec Scan Data, Moving Annual Total based on National to December 2016 

KIDS & BREKKIE INFOGRAPHIC

  1. Galaxy Research, May 2015, survey of n=1000 Australian parents of primary school children aged 5-12 years.
  2. Williams PG. The Benefits of Breakfast Cereal Consumption: A Systematic Review of the Evidence Base. Advances in Nutrition 2014; 5: 636S-673S.
  3. Fayet F, Ridges L, Sritharan N, Petocz P. Breakfast cereal consumption is associated with higher micronutrient and milk intake among Australian Children. Australasian Medical Journal 2011; 4(12):775.
  4. Hoyland A, Dye L, Lawton CL. A systematic review of the effect of breakfast on the cognitive performance of children and adolescents. Nutrition Research Reviews 2009; 22: 220-243.

5 MINUTES, BIG REWARDS

  1. ABCMF Study, 2013, Galaxy Research. A representative sample of 1001 Australians aged 18-64 years. 
  2. Australian Breakfast Cereal Manufacturers Forum calculation based in part on data reported by Nielsen through its ScanTrack and Homescan service for the Cereals, Fresh Milk and UHT Milk categories, Cereal Partners Worldwide for the 52-week period ending December 31, 2016. (Copyright © 2016, Nielsen.)
  3. Wolfe WS, Campbell CC, Frongillo EA, Haas JD, Melnik TA. (1994) Overweight schoolchildren in New York State: Prevalence and characteristics. Am. J. Pub. Health. 84(5): 807-813.
  4. Nutrition Research Australia, Breakfast and Breakfast Cereal Consumption Among Australians – A secondary analysis of the 2011-12 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey, Sydney, February 2016
  5. Grains & Legumes Nutrition Council. 2016 Breakfast Cereal Audit. Unpublished: 2016.
  6. Preziosi P, Galan P, Deheeger M, Yacoub N, Drewnowski A, Hereberg S. (1999) Breakfast type, daily nutrient intakes and vitamin and mineral status of French children, adolescents and adults. J. Am. Coll. Nutr. 18(2): 171-178.
  7. Croezen S, et al. (2009) Skipping breakfast, alcohol consumption and physical inactivity as risk factors for overweight and obesity in adolescents: results of the E-MOVO project. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. V63-I3: 405-12.
  8. Pollitt E, et al. (1981) Brief fasting, stress and cognition in children. Am. J. of Clin. Nutr. 34: 1526-1533.
  9. Pollitt E, Mathews R. (1998) Breakfast and cognition: an integrative summary. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. V67: 804S–13S.
  10. Australian Bureau of Statistics. Australian Health Survey: Nutrition First Results – Foods and Nutrients, 2011-12. Canberra: ABS; 2014.

A HEALTHY HABIT 

  1. Deshmukh-Taskar PR, et al. (2010). The relationship of breakfast skipping and type of breakfast consumption with nutrient intake and weight status in children and adolescents: The national health and nutrition examination survey 1999-2006. J Am Diet Assoc. 110: 869-878.
  2. De la Hunty A, Ashwell M. (2007) Are people who regularly eat breakfast cereals slimmer than those who don´t? A systematic review of the evidence. Nutrition Bulletin. V32-I2: 118-28.
  3. Williams PG. The Benefits of Breakfast Cereal Consumption: A Systematic Review of the Evidence Base. Adv Nutr 2014; 5:636S-673S.
  4. Slavin J and Green H. Dietary fibre and satiety. Nutrition Bulletin 2007;32(Suppl 1): 32-42.
  5. Hamedani A et Reduced energy intake at breakfast is not compensated for at lunch if a high-insoluble-fiber cereal replaces a low-fiber cereal. Am J Clin Nutr 2009; 89:5:1343-9.
  6. Haines PS, Guilkey DK, Popkin B. (1996) Trends in breakfast consumption of US adults between 1965 and 1991. J. Am. Diet Assoc. 96(5): 464-470.
  7. Wolfe WS, Campbell CC, Frongillo EA, Haas JD, Melnik TA. (1994) Overweight schoolchildren in New York State: Prevalence and characteristics. Am. J. Pub. Health. 84(5): 807-813.
  8. Nutrition Research Australia, Breakfast and Breakfast Cereal Consumption Among Australians – A secondary analysis of the 2011-12 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey, Sydney, February 2016
  9. Williams P. Breakfast and the diets of Australian adults: An analysis of data from the 1995 National Nutrition Survey. International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition 2005; 56:1:65-79.
  10. National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). Australian Dietary Guidelines. Canberra: NHMRC; 2013:45.
  11. Barton BA, Eldridge AL, Thompson D, Affenito SG, Striegel-Moore RH, Franko DL, Albertson AM, Crockett SJ. The Relationship of breakfast and cereal consumption to nutrient intake and Body Mass Index; The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 2005; 105:1383-1389.
  12. Grieger JA, Chan L, Moss C, Miller M, Celander M, Cobiac L. Diet and physical activity differences in Australian adolescent male consumers and non consumers of ready-to-eat cereals. Nutrition Society of Australia. Perth, 2010.
  13. Grains & Legumes Nutrition Council (GLNC). GLNC 2016 Breakfast Cereal Audit. Unpublished: 2016..
  14. Burrows T et al (2016) Is there an association between dietary intake and academic achievement: a systematic review. J Hum Nutr Diet. doi: 10.1111/jhn.12407 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jhn.12407/full
  15. O’Dea JA, Mugridge AC. Nutritional quality of breakfast and physical activity independently predict the literacy and numeracy scores of children after adjusting for socioeconomic status. Health Education Research 2012; 27:975-985.
  16. Kleinman RE, et al. Diet, breakfast, and academic performance in children. Ann Nutr Metab 2002; 46 (suppl 1): 24-30.
  17. O’Sullivan TA, Robinson M, Kendall GE, Miller M, Jacoby P, Silburn SR, Oddy WH. A good-quality breakfast is associated with better mental health in adolescence. Public Health Nutrition 2008; 12: 2: 249-258.
  18. Hoyland A, Dye L, Lawton CL. A systematic review of the effect of breakfast on the cognitive performance of children and adolescents. Nutrition Research Reviews 2009; 22: 220-243.
  19. Wyon DP, Abrahamsson L, Jartelius M, Fletcher R. An experimental study of the effect of energy intake at breakfast on the test performance of 10-year old children in school. Int. J. Food Sc. Nutr 1997; 48: 5-12.
  20. Min Xu MD, PhD, Tao Huang PhD, Albert W. Lee PhD, Lu Qi MD, PhD &Susan Cho PhD (2015): Ready-to-Eat Cereal Consumption with Total and Cause-Specific Mortality: Prospective Analysis of 367,442 Individuals, Journal of the American College of Nutrition, DOI: 10.1080/07315724.2014.971193]
  21. Huang et al. Consumption of whole grains and cereal fiber and total and cause-specific mortality: prospective analysis of 367,442 individuals.BMC Medicine 2015; 13:59 DOI 10.1186/s12916-015-0294-7 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/13/59
  22. Chen G-C, et al. Whole-grain intake and total, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies.Am J Clin Nutr 2016;104:164–72.
  23. Aune D, et al. Whole grain consumption and risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and all cause and cause specific mortality: systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies.”BMJ 2016;353:i2716 doi:10.1136/bmj.i2716

BREKKIE STATS

  1. Kellogg Company 2016
  2. Aztec Scan Data, Moving Annual Total based on National to December 2016 
  3. Nutrition Research Australia, Breakfast and Breakfast Cereal Consumption Among Australians – A secondary analysis of the 2011-12 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey, Sydney, February 2016
  4. Grains & Legumes Nutrition Council. 2016 Breakfast Cereal Audit. Unpublished: 2016.
  5. Responses from Galaxy Research conducted in July 2016 among a nationally representative sample of 1,382 respondents across Australia

FAQs

  1. Grains & Legumes Nutrition Council. 2016 Breakfast Cereal Audit. Unpublished: 2016.
  2. Grimes CA, Campbell KJ, Riddell LJ, Nowson CA. (2011) Sources of sodium in Australian children’s diets and the effect of the implication of sodium targets to food products to reduce sodium intake British Journal of Nutrition 105:468-477.
  3. Cereal Foods and Legume Consumption by Australian Children: Secondary Analysis of the 2007 National Children’s Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey. 2009
  4. Williams PG, McMahon A, Boustead R. (2003) A case study of sodium reduction in breakfast cereals and the impact of the Pick the Tick food information program in Australia. Health Promotion International, 18 (1), 51-56.
  5. Williams PG. The Benefits of Breakfast Cereal Consumption: A Systematic Review of the Evidence Base. Adv Nutr 2014;5:636S-673S. doi:10.3945/an.114.006247.
  6. Williams P. (2007) Breakfast and the diets of Australian children and adolescents. An analysis of data from the 1995 National Nutrition Survey. International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, 58, 201–216.
  7. De la Hunty A, Ashwell M. (2007) Are people who regularly eat breakfast cereals slimmer than those who don´t? A systematic review of the evidence. Nutrition Bulletin. V32-I2: 118-28.
  8. Nutrition Research Australia, Breakfast and Breakfast Cereal Consumption Among Australians – A secondary analysis of the 2011-12 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey, Sydney, February 2016
  9. Williams PG. (2005) Breakfast and the diets of Australian adults. An analysis of data from the 1995 National Nutrition Survey. International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition 56 65-79.
  10. Barton BA, Eldridge AL, Thompson D, Affenito SG, Striegel-Moore RH, Franko DL, Albertson AM and Crockett SJ. (2005) The Relationship of Breakfast and cereal consumption to nutrient intake and Body Mass Index; The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 105: 1383-1389.
  11. Grieger JA, Chan L, Moss C, Miller M, Celander M, Cobiac L. Diet and physical activity differences in Australian adolescent male consumers and non consumers of ready-to-eat cereals. Nutrition Society of Australia. Perth, 2010.
  12. National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). Australian Dietary Guidelines. Canberra: NHMRC; 2013:45.
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